Free Newsletter:

RSS
Grooves of Houston - Houston's Premier Upscale Nightspot

Film Review: Deep Throat's POV Depicted in 'Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down The White House'

by Todd A. Smith

 

(Photo Credit: Sony Pictures Classics) 

 

All the President’s Enemies 

 

1/2

 

Watergate.

 

Deep Throat.

 

Washington Post.

 

President Richard Milhous Nixon.

 

Resignation.

 

Pardon.

 

“All the President’s Men.”

 

And finally, “Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down The White House” brings arguably the most infamous story in Washington, D.C. history from the perspective of arguably the most significant whistleblower in American history.

 

And thanks to Liam Neeson’s portrayal of FBI agent Mark Felt, Deep Throat’s story is depicted with strength, vulnerability, relate-ability and complexity in the film “Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House.”

 

The historical drama “Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House” is like a true extended episode of “House of Cards” and the opening credits of the film even seem like the opening credits of “House of Cards” with its shots of downtown Washington, D.C. and suspicious music in the background.

 

In the film, Felt is a lifer in J. Edgar Hoover’s FBI.

 

The G-Man tows the company line and is completely loyal to the bureau.

 

So when President Nixon, who is seeking reelection in 1972 in the midst of social unrest because of the unpopularity of the Vietnam War, has his aides ask Felt how the White House should go about relieving Hoover of his duties, the agent balks at the suggestion.

 

Past presidents like President John F. Kennedy and President Lyndon B. Johnson did not like Hoover, but did not necessarily have the guts to fire the FBI director.

 

Felt lets Nixon’s aides know that it would not be a good idea to fire Hoover because of the damning information and secrets he has on many powerful politicians including Nixon.

 

However, when Hoover dies unexpectedly the old rules of the FBI end and those alleged secret files have to mysteriously come up missing.

 

Felt is highly respected inside the bureau, and is the likely successor to Hoover.

 

However, when President Nixon selects L. Patrick Gray (Marton Csokas, “Loving”), someone from his inner circle and with no law enforcement experience, Felt feels the slight and that slight leads to one of the most controversial investigations in history, Watergate.

 

While Gray wants to close the book on Watergate and allow the Nixon administration to continue with their second term in the White House, Felt knows the break-in at the Democratic headquarters at the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C. is more sinister than a mere burglary.

 

Gray seems to be more loyal to the White House while Felt knows that the FBI is an independent organization that does not answer to the White House or any political leader.

 

Therefore in “Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House,” the disgruntled FBI agent begins leaking information about the investigation to Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward (Julian Morris), which leads to arguably the most embarrassing moment for any U.S. president.

 

For decades, the infamous Deep Throat was a mysterious figure that appeared in the shadows of such classic films as “All the President’s Men,” which told the Watergate story from the perspective of the journalists who broke the story.

 

In that film, Deep Throat appears more in voice than visually.

 

But thanks to Felt admitting that he was Deep Throat in 2005, moviegoers and book lovers finally get to hear his story from his perspective.

 

Felt’s perspective of the political corruption is no surprise to a generation of people who love television shows like “Scandal” and “House of Cards.”

 

As a matter of fact, “Scandal” star Tony Goldwyn leads a stellar supporting cast, which also includes Josh Lucas (“Glory Road”) and Diane Lee (“Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice”).

 

However, Neeson is the most stellar of them all, portraying Felt in a powerful and intense manner.

 

“Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down The White House” weaves real footage of anti-Vietnam War protests with election and resignation footage of Nixon.

 

However, filmmaker Peter Landesman should have used some classic Motown music from the early 1970s like Edwin Starr’s “War” or any song from Marvin Gaye’s album “What’s Going On?” to really give it that 1970s vibe like the suits and cars used in “Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down The White House.”

 

Nevertheless, the historical drama has all of the necessary elements for success.

 

History.

 

Truth.

 

Honesty.

 

Whistleblowing

 

Intrigue.

 

 

REGAL RATINGS

FOUR CROWNS=EXCELLENT

THREE CROWNS=GOOD

TWO CROWNS=AVERAGE

ONE CROWN=POOR

This article was published on Friday 20 October, 2017.
Current Comments: 0
Write Review



Back to main topic: Historical Dramas
Magazine Topics:
New Articles
All Topics
 About Us ->
 Archives ->
 Business ->
 Community ->
 Entertainment ->
   Celebrity News
   Film ->
     Academy Awards
     Action
     Action Comedy
     Action Films
     Adventure
     Animation
     Biopics
     Blaxploitation
     Book Adaptations
     Buddy Comedies
     Comedy
     Comedy/Romantic Comedy
     Comic Book Movies
     Coming of Age Films
     Crime Movies
     Dark Comedy
     DC Comic Films
     Documentaries
     Drama
     Dramedy
     DVD Reviews
     Gangster Flicks
     Heist Films
     Historical Dramas
     Holiday Films
     Horror
     Horror/Suspense
     Inspirational Films
     Martial Arts Films
     Marvel Films
     Musicals
     Mystery
     Noir
     Period Pieces
     Prequels
     Psychological Thrillers
     Religious Films
     Romance
     RomCom
     Satire
     Sci-Fi
     Science Fiction
     Sequels
     Shorts
     Spoofs
     Sports Films
     Spy Films
     Superhero Movies
     Suspense
     Thrillers
     True Stories
     War Films
     Westerns
   Live Productions
   Music ->
   Pop Culture
   Regal Roundtable
   Stand Up Comedy
   Television ->
 Lifestyle ->
 Opinion ->
 Regal Queens
 Sports ->
Articles RSS Feed